Features
France’s New Prostitution Law: More Problematic Than it Seems

France’s New Prostitution Law: More Problematic Than it Seems

After two years of internal parliamentary conflict, French MPs passed a controversial law on 7 April which makes paying for sex a criminal offence. First offenders are to be fined €1500, and second-time offenders will be charged €3750 and have the infraction marked on their criminal record. MP Maud Olivier, a proponent of the Bill,...
Barely Legal: The Ethical Implications of the Panama Papers

Barely Legal: The Ethical Implications of the Panama Papers

In a sensational combination of power, wealth, and financial secrecy, the now ubiquitous ‘Panama Papers’ revealed a treasure trove of previously inaccessible information about the opaque operations of offshore finance. The leak, divulged from the files of Panama City-based law firm Mossack Fonseca on 4 April, represents the world’s largest release of confidential documents to...
Tales from the Bottom of the Barrel: What’s Happening to Oil?

Tales from the Bottom of the Barrel: What’s Happening to Oil?

The story of global commodities cast a dark shadow over much of 2015 and this gloominess looks likely to continue in 2016. The price of crude oil has fallen from $105 per barrel in June 2014 to a meager $31 in February 2016. This represents more than a 70 per cent drop in less than...
Feeding the Hungry: More Harm Than Good?

Feeding the Hungry: More Harm Than Good?

Hunger is, at its root, one of the oldest problems to plague the human race. Currently there are reportedly over 800 million people suffering from hunger worldwide. The United States, in particular, has played a leading role in the perennial struggle against hunger and malnutrition. In this role, the United States both provides cash-based assistance...
Left out in the cold? What Jeremy Corbyn’s Foreign Policy Would Mean for the UK

Left out in the cold? What Jeremy Corbyn’s Foreign Policy Would Mean for the UK

On 12th September, left-winger Jeremy Corbyn was elected as the Leader of Her Majesty’s Most Loyal Opposition in a move described by Prime Minister David Cameron as a ‘threat to national security’[1] and a ‘radical breakthrough in British politics’ by the Russian Ambassador to London[2]. His distinct – some may say radical – foreign policy...
What was Said (And More Importantly, What Wasn’t) at the 70th UN General Assembly

What was Said (And More Importantly, What Wasn’t) at the 70th UN General Assembly

In Obama’s address to the 70th meeting of the United Nations general assembly (UNGA), he reminded the member-state delegates, “Nowhere is our commitment to international order more tested than in Syria.  When a dictator slaughters tens of thousands of his own people, that is not just a matter of one nation’s internal affairs — it...
The Year the World Began to Fragment

The Year the World Began to Fragment

The collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 unleashed a geopolitical trend that has largely held steady into the present day. That is, the United States became the world’s sole superpower: with a national economy of unparalleled size, a military of unprecedented global reach, and the political capital to intervene in regional affairs to a...
The World's Women in 2014-15: Knowing the Facts and Acknowledging the Gaps

The World’s Women in 2014-15: Knowing the Facts and Acknowledging the Gaps

Time magazine posted an article online in December of 2014 entitled ‘This may have been the best year for women since the dawn of time’. It has received many different responses, but Huffington Post retorted with a particularly astute notion, ‘2014 was a bad year for women, but a good one for feminism’.  Although both...
Split in the National Front: Mistake Before the Elections?

Split in the National Front: Mistake Before the Elections?

Jean-Marie Le Pen’s interview with far-right newspaper Rivarol led to the climax of the political fight between him and his daughter, party leader Marine Le Pen. Ms. Le Pen released a condemning statement of his actions following her father’s words defending Philippe Pétain (the Chief of State of Vichy France), calling the gas chambers “a...
Labeling a Legacy

Labeling a Legacy

The passing of Singapore’s founding father Mr Lee Kuan Yew has seen an outpouring of praise and admiration matched with an equal amount of scrutiny and judgement for the nation’s first Prime Minister. Many in the Western press have contended Mr Lee to be a ‘benevolent dictator’ that built a prosperous and stable ‘nanny-state’ devoid...
What Does the Policy-Academia Gap Really Look Like?

What Does the Policy-Academia Gap Really Look Like?

It is well documented that a gap does exist between International Relations and the foreign policy establishment.  Nicholas Kristof prominently referred to political science in general as irrelevant and ‘cloistered,’ arguing that the two camps should move more closely to one another.  But what does this gap really look like? There are a couple of...
Underdog Overwatch: The Often-Ignored Foreign Policies of Our Rising Parties

Underdog Overwatch: The Often-Ignored Foreign Policies of Our Rising Parties

Boredom and disillusionment are the familiar starting points in many political conversations today. Especially in the wake of the unsuccessful secession attempt in Scotland last September, other avenues have re-opened and provided the establishment with the shake-up it desperately needed. With public political intake still dominated by both the Labour and Conservative parties – as...