The Foreign Affairs Review is governed by a subcommittee of the Foreign Affairs Society, but its day-to-day operations are managed by the Editorial Board. Members of the Editorial Board can be reached at fareview@st-andrews.ac.uk. If you wish to reach a specific member of the Board, put their first name as the first word of the email’s title. The Foreign Affairs Review also maintains a bureau in the Washington DC area, overseen by the DC Bureau Chief and one editor. The Foreign Affairs Review retains a photographer and graphic designer, Martin Lyle, and a webmaster.

 

Editorial Board

Tarleton Watkins, Editor-in-Chief

Tarleton is a fourth-year joint-honours International Relations and French student at the University of St Andrews. He has many interests within the field of International Relations, including international political economy; international development; sub-Saharan African politics, economies, and agriculture; and is a lifelong student of United States government and foreign policy.  Tarleton has completed internships working for an American congressional campaign, at the United States Senate, and at MIT’s Center for Advanced Urbanism, focusing on challenges to sub-Saharan African agribusiness.

J.P. Carroll, Executive Editor
J.P. Carroll is a Fourth Year International Relations student in the inaugural class of the Joint Degree Program between The University of St Andrews and The College of William & Mary in Virginia.  Although J.P. Carroll is from McLean, Virginia (near Washington D.C.) he has also lived in: Buenos Aires, Madrid, Luxembourg, Brussels and has half of his family in Lima, Peru.  From September 2013 to May 2014, J.P. was the Founder and Chief of the D.C. Bureau based out of the College of William & Mary.  In the summer of 2014, J.P. was a Research Intern at the Cato Institute’s Center for Global Liberty and Prosperity in Washington D.C. where he specialized in Latin American affairs.  He has also worked in free speech advocacy at Reporters Without Borders in Washington D.C in August 2013.  He has also worked in the finance and insurance industries at: VPB Finance S.A. in Luxembourg , BNP Paribas in Brussels,  and Gray and Associates in Lima.  As an International Relations student, J.P. is most interested in: the international ramifications of U.S. politics, Latin American commodities politics & journalism, the European Union and international finance.

Matthew Valla, Editor

Matthew Valla is a fourth year International Relations student at the University of St. Andrews. Born in Walnut Creek, California, Matthew has long been interested in foreign policy, often from a security aspect. He also maintains an active interest in history, particularly in that of Imperial China.

Michelle RyanEditor

Michelle Ryan is a fourth year student of International Relations and Co-President of the University of St Andrews Foreign Affairs Society. She is primarily interested in the intersection of international economic policy and social justice considerations, especially as related to economic statecraft, climate politics, and international development. She draws upon her experiences studying at the National University of Singapore; completing internships with the U.S. Department of State in Washington D.C. and London; and working for both non-profit advocacy and international risk consulting firms.

Braden Harris, Editor

Braden Harris is an American third year student of International Relations. During the summer of 2013, Braden had the opportunity to work as a research intern for the Foreign Policy Research Institute in Philadelphia, where he studied foreign involvement in the Syrian Civil War. His academic interests include geopolitics, irregular warfare, and the political implications of technological advances in the realm of security.

Timothy Poirson, Editor

Tim is a first year PhD student in International Relations at the University of Saint Andrews. His research interests lie in the fields of Conflict, Terrorism, and Political Violence. He is particularly interested in the question of the interaction between nonviolent/civil resistance and violent groups in the aftermath of uprising/revolution, or simply put, how one does not engage in political violence when the context presents itself. His regional affinity lies in the MENA (Middle East and North Africa), which has led him to write many pieces on issues pertaining to the region as an analyst with the Foreign Affairs Review.

Hannah Middleton Cope, Editor

 

Elizabeth Stockton, Editor

Elizabeth Stockton is second year student of International Relations and Spanish.  She has interned on a successful U.S. Senate campaign and in the U.S. Senate in Washington, DC and maintains a keen focus on U.S. domestic politics while studying at St Andrews. After having spent multiple summers working on youth empowerment programs in Latin America, Elizabeth became more engaged in children’s rights campaigns with the international NGO Plan International as a Youth Advisory Board member. Her main areas of interest are Latin America, global health, U.S. politics, and human rights.

 

 

Washington DC Bureau

Lucas Leblanc, Editor
Lucas Leblanc is a third-year student at The College of William and Mary pursuing a major in international relations and a minor in economics. He comes from a Franco-Italian household and grew up in the Washington DC area. This background exposed him to an interest in foreign affairs from a young age. Recently, Lucas has taught English in the Balkans, worked for the AidData Center for Development Policy, and done research related to European integration and Catalan separatism. He is also a member of his school’s Model United Nations team, having traveled to conferences ranging from Columbia’s Model United Nations simulation in New York to Harvard’s 2012 World Model United Nations Conference hosted by the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. His interest in international relations lie in European integration and governance issues.